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Jul082003

Raney Zusman Ranks High in Bypass Surgery

The O.C. hospital was one of only three to be given a top ranking.

August 3, 2001

By MAYRAV SAAR
The Orange County Register

SACRAMENTO -- Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian was one of only three hospitals in the state to receive a high rating in a new report that measures how well California hospitals do in bypass operations.

The Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, the agency that oversees hospitals, set out to rate all 118 hospitals in California that perform coronary artery bypass grafts for the report released Thursday.

But only 79 hospitals released data for the voluntary study.

Of those, four performed worse than expected, based on the risk level of their patients.

"We are delighted to be distinguished," said Dr. Aidan Raney, director of cardiac surgery at Hoag.

Raney is part of a trio of surgeons, along with Douglas Zusman and Colin Joyo, who performed 480 heart procedures at the hospital last year. Of those, 60 percent were bypass-graft surgeries.

The study, the first in a series of reports on bypass surgery mortality, was based on data from 70 percent of bypass surgeries done from 1997 to 1998.

Summit Medical Center in Oakland and Sutter Memorial in Sacramento also received a rating of "better than expected" by the agency.

Mercy San Juan Hospital in Sacramento, John Muir Medical Center in Walnut Creek, Downey Community Hospital, and Presbyterian Inter-Community Hospital in Whittier performed worse than expected.

Raney said he was surprised to learn that so few hospitals exceeded the state's expectations, and attributes Hoag's rating to strong teamwork.

Study directors said the results will encourage all hospitals in the state to improve.

And it will help the 27,000 Californians who receive coronary artery bypass graft annually make a decision about where to receive treatment, said Cheryl Damberg, a co-director of the study.

Damberg said patients previously had "little or no information to guide decisions on where to have surgery."

To read the full report: http://www.oshpd.state.ca.us

The Associated Press contributed to this report.